5 Reasons Why Reading is the Key to Writing Success

FairOaksBookshelfPicbyCindyFazziWant to be a writer? Read, read, and read some more. It’s the first requirement for writing well. Don’t take my word for it, take Stephen King’s. He said: “You have to read widely, constantly refining (and redefining) your own work as you do. If you don’t have the time to read, you don’t have the time (or the tools) to write.” (more…)

Pearson Remains World’s Biggest Publisher

Pearson’s sales declined by 15 percent, but it remained the world’s biggest publishing company, according to the Livres Hebdo/Publishers Weekly annual ranking. Total revenues for the world’s 50 biggest publishers topped $50 billion in 2016. (more…)

Gosh Darn It! Study Shows More Cussing in American Books

Photo Credit: Simon Adriaensen via Visual Hunt / CC BY-ND

There’s a significant increase in the use of swear words in American books, a sign that Americans are more accepting of taboo words, according to a recent study. The research showed that books published between 2005 and 2008 were 28 times more likely to include cussing than books published in the early 1950s. (more…)

Guess Which Country is the Most Literate? Hint: It’s Not the U.S.

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Finland is the most literate country in the world, followed by Norway and Iceland, according to an infographic by Global English Editing. The United States is ranked seventh. (more…)

38 Lines from Novels and Movies You Won’t Soon Forget

Marlon Brando as Don Vito Corleone in Francis Ford Coppola’s “The Godfather” (1972.)

Whether it’s your kid offering a slice of pizza to his sibling or your friend volunteering to babysit, the person might say, “I’m gonna make you an offer you can’t refuse.” Many people know the line though they have never seen Francis Ford Coppola’s 1972 movie, “The Godfather.” The dialogue has taken on a life of its own. There are many movies and novels like that; they are famous for zingers and memorable dialogues. (more…)

38 Literary Characters You Won’t Forget—For Better or For Worse

Jennifer Ehle as Elizabeth Bennet in BBC’s “Pride and Prejudice” (1995).

William Faulkner’s approach to writing a character explains why some literary characters are so real.  “Once he stands up on his feet and begins to move, all I can do is trot along behind him with a paper and pencil trying to keep up long enough to put down what he says and does,” said Faulkner. (more…)

Why Corporate America Frowns on These 13 Traits of Creative People

Monet Paintings-CindyFazziPic

Special traits set an artist like Claude Monet apart. (Photo by Cindy Fazzi)

If you’re a writer or artist or scientist and you like working on your own, it could be a double-edged sword. On the one hand, independence is one of 13 traits of highly creative and productive people. On the other hand, employers will say you’re not a team player. (more…)

This Summer, Read More Books for Fun—and Good Health

Photo credit: TinaOable via Visualhunt / CC BY-NC-SA

Summer is here—stretching out as far as the eye could see. It’s a great time to catch up with our reading, not just for fun but also for our health. Multiple research studies have shown the many benefits of reading, from reducing stress to increasing empathy. The greatest benefit of all? Reading will help you live longer! (more…)

Two Chinese-American Novels Redefine the American Dream

(Image courtesy of Penguin Random House)

All the political talk about the place of immigrants in America under the present political climate got me on an immigrant-saga kick in my readings. I was happy to discover two excellent debut novels:  Celeste Ng’s “Everything I Never Told You” and Jade Chang’s “Wangs vs. the World.” (more…)

Study: Reading Completion Rate Correlates with Reader’s Age

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Finishing a book depends a great deal on a reader’s age, according to a study by Jellybooks. In most cases, completion rates were higher for readers under 35 and those older than 45. Readers between those two groups had the lowest completion rate. (more…)