Snowflake, Alternative Fact, Post-Truth, & Other New Words Stemming from Politics

(Photo via Visual Hunt)

(Photo via Visual Hunt)

The new political order in America has added new words to our vocabulary. The media and technology also continue to influence our ever-growing lexicon. (more…)

Normcore, Americaphobia, and 8 Other New Words to Take Note Of

Are you emojinal? Photo credit: Wicker Paradise via Visual hunt / CC BY

Are you emojinal? (Photo by Wicker Paradise via Visual hunt / CC BY)

The English language evolves all the time. New words are born and old words change meanings. This evolution is part of what makes writing exciting. Here are 10 new or newly coined words to take note of. (more…)

8 Overused and Meaningless Words to Avoid

Photo credit: Leo Reynolds via VisualHunt.com / CC BY-NC-SA

Photo credit: Leo Reynolds via VisualHunt.com / CC BY-NC-SA

There are about one million English words, according to the Merriam-Webster dictionary. If you’re a writer, you have plenty to choose from. You have no reason to resort to overused words that have become meaningless. (more…)

Verb, Verbing, Verbification: Turning Nouns into Verbs

The dictionary defines “bicycle” as both a noun and a verb. (Photo courtesy of the New York Public Library Digital Collection)

The dictionary defines bicycle as both a noun and a verb. (Photo courtesy of the New York Public Library Digital Collection)

It’s easy to blame Google for our tendency to turn nouns into verbs. We all say, “Just Google it,” instead of “Search it on Google.” This inclination, however, goes back a long way. (more…)

Common Mistakes about 10 Common Phrases

It’s easy to have peace of mind (not piece of mind) when you’re relaxing on this gorgeous beach on Maui (Photo by Cindy Fazzi).

It’s easy to have peace of mind (not piece of mind) when you’re relaxing on this gorgeous beach in Maui (Photo by Cindy Fazzi).

Hear, hear—don’t write “here, here” if you’re referring to the phrase expressing approval. Don’t take my word for it, check out the dictionary. The expression, which goes back to the 17th century, is short for “hear this, hear this.” (more…)